sexuallyambiguousphan:

The best part is he still hadn’t taken down all the post-its.

it’s so hard to find a roommate who will also tweet on your behalf.

toughpigs:

This Muppet fan’s daughter is too young to go to Comic Con, so he held his own panel with Kermit and Fozzie for her.

toughpigs:

This Muppet fan’s daughter is too young to go to Comic Con, so he held his own panel with Kermit and Fozzie for her.

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

gamespite:

grimelords:

algopop:

Bots - talking amongst themselves - via

A twitter conversation between two bots (@oliviataters and @notkeithcalder) was picked up and intercepted by the Bank of America bot account. This is twitter bot culture sans humans. 

we did it

Like so much of speculative sci-fi, Skynet’s self-awareness turned out to be terribly disappointing in real life.

muppetmindset:

Revisiting the Muppet movies before Muppets Most Wanted 

4/8 - The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992)

"It’s in the singing of a street corner choir; it’s going home and getting warm by the fire. It’s true wherever you find love it feels like Christmas."

I can’t wait for Christmas.

nurmengardx:

nerdjpg:

northgang:

…the future of pizza (X)

none pizza left beef

ya’ll wrong: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9U2ekOVL5Q

somethingruthless:

hello brand new followers

welcome

dion-thesocialist:

rakshar:

dion-thesocialist:

I apologize to everyone whose grammar I ever corrected before I learned not to be a tool.

your forgiven.

You’re… really sweet to do that. Thanks.

fookyeahconradveidt:

bunnyfood:

(via annysadventuresinwonderland)

If only the man had been a winger for the Maple Leafs, this would have been officially the Most Canadian Post Evar.

I thought in Canada it was Tim Hourtons?

fookyeahconradveidt:

bunnyfood:

(via annysadventuresinwonderland)

If only the man had been a winger for the Maple Leafs, this would have been officially the Most Canadian Post Evar.

I thought in Canada it was Tim Hourtons?

haveimadeit:

You have heard the tolling of 11 strokes.
This is to remind us that with Elks, the hour of 11 has a tender significance.
Wherever Elks may roam, whatever their lot in life may be, when this hour falls upon the dial of night, the great heart of Elkdom swells and throbs.
It is the golden hour of recollection, the homecoming of those who wander, the mystic roll call of those who will come no more.
Living or dead, Elks are never forgotten, never forsaken.
Morning and noon may pass them by, the light of day sink heedlessly in the West, but ere the shadows of midnight shall fall, the chimes of memory will be pealing forth the friendly message,
"To our absent members."

haveimadeit:

Has anybody seen my fucks? Am I out? Is it possible that I gave all my fucks away? Could it be that I don’t have a single fuck to give?

rockhalllibrary:

Happy Birthday Nils Lofgren!

Nils Hilmer Lofgren, was born June 21, 1951, in Chicago, and has had a multi-decade career as both a solo artist and members of both Crazy Horse and the E Street Band. Learn more about this 2014 inductee at the Library and Archives.

Video: Lofgren performs the Goffin/King song “Goin’ Back” on The Old Grey Whistle Test in 1976.